Received Papers

The Assumptions of Bell’s Proof

Roderich Tumulka Submitted to “Quantum Nonlocality and Reality – 50 Years of Bell’s theorem” While it is widely agreed that Bell’s theorem is an important result in the foundations of quantum physics, there is much disagreement about what exactly Bell’s theorem shows. It is agreed that Bell derived a contradiction with experimental facts from some list of assumptions, thus showing… Read more →

What Retrocausal Explanations Look Like

Ken Wharton Submitted to “Quantum Nonlocality and Reality – 50 Years of Bell’s theorem” While it is generally known that retrocausal models can provide an account of Bell-inequality violations in terms of spacetime-local beables, new models can now explicitly show how this comes about. By analyzing a simple local-beable model that precisely recovers the quantum joint probabilities for measurements on… Read more →

Non-local beables

I would like to begin with Bell’s remark on the possibility that the beables are non-local, which Tim Maudlin quotes. “Of course, we may be obliged to develop theories in which there are no strictly local beables. That possibility will not be considered here[1].” When I read that yesterday I was astounded because it made me realize that ever since encountering Bell’s theorem as… Read more →

Bell on Bohm

Sheldon Goldstein Submitted to “Quantum Nonlocality and Reality – 50 Years of Bell’s theorem” A memorial conference for John Bell, open to the public, was held at Rutgers University around 20 years ago. I gave there a short talk on Bell’s views about David Bohm’s “hidden variables” formulation of quantum mechanics, a version of quantum mechanics often called the de… Read more →

Strengthening Bell’s Theorem: Removing the Hidden-Variable Assumption

Henry P. Stapp Submitted to “Quantum Nonlocality and Reality – 50 Years of Bell’s theorem” The Bell’s theorem proofs are rightly identified as proofs of the incompatibility of “local realism” with the predictions of quantum mechanics. But “local realism” brings in both alien-to-quantum-theory classical concepts and also an “outcome independence” condition whose inclusion nullifies those theorems as possible proofs of… Read more →

Experimental tests of Bell inequalities

Marco Genovese Submitted to “Quantum Nonlocality and Reality – 50 Years of Bell’s theorem” 1964 was a wonderful year for physics, in this “annus mirabilis”, summarising and simplifying a little, quark model was proposed by Gell-Mann and Zweig and charm and colour properties were introduced, Higgs published his work on the scalar boson, $\Omega$ boson and CP violation were discovered,… Read more →

Quantum Solipsism and Non-Locality

Travis Norsen Submitted to “Quantum Nonlocality and Reality – 50 Years of Bell’s theorem” J.S. Bell’s remarkable 1964 theorem showed that any theory sharing the empirical predictions of orthodox quantum mechanics would have to exhibit a surprising — and, from the point of view of relativity theory, very troubling — kind of non-locality. Unfortunately, even still on this 50th anniversary,… Read more →

Bell on Bell’s theorem: The changing face of nonlocality

Harvey R. Brown and Christopher G. Timpson Submitted to “Quantum Nonlocality and Reality – 50 Years of Bell’s theorem” Between 1964 and 1990, the notion of nonlocality in Bell’s papers underwent a profound change as his nonlocality theorem gradually became detached from quantum mechanics, and referred to wider probabilistic theories involving correlations between separated beables. The proposition that standard quantum mechanics… Read more →

Measurement and Macroscopicity: Overcoming Conceptual Imprecision in Quantum Measurement Theory

Gregg Jaeger Submitted to “Quantum Nonlocality and Reality – 50 Years of Bell’s theorem” John S. Bell, of course, is most well known for the result now referred to simply as “Bell’s theorem”, which removed from consideration the class of so-called local hidden-variable theories which at the time of its publishing appeared to be the most natural class of theories… Read more →