Received Papers

Quantum Solipsism and Non-Locality

Travis Norsen Submitted to “Quantum Nonlocality and Reality – 50 Years of Bell’s theorem” J.S. Bell’s remarkable 1964 theorem showed that any theory sharing the empirical predictions of orthodox quantum mechanics would have to exhibit a surprising — and, from the point of view of relativity theory, very troubling — kind of non-locality. Unfortunately, even still on this 50th anniversary,… Read more →

Bell on Bell’s theorem: The changing face of nonlocality

Harvey R. Brown and Christopher G. Timpson Submitted to “Quantum Nonlocality and Reality – 50 Years of Bell’s theorem” Between 1964 and 1990, the notion of nonlocality in Bell’s papers underwent a profound change as his nonlocality theorem gradually became detached from quantum mechanics, and referred to wider probabilistic theories involving correlations between separated beables. The proposition that standard quantum mechanics… Read more →

Measurement and Macroscopicity: Overcoming Conceptual Imprecision in Quantum Measurement Theory

Gregg Jaeger Submitted to “Quantum Nonlocality and Reality – 50 Years of Bell’s theorem” John S. Bell, of course, is most well known for the result now referred to simply as “Bell’s theorem”, which removed from consideration the class of so-called local hidden-variable theories which at the time of its publishing appeared to be the most natural class of theories… Read more →

What did Bell really prove?

Jean Bricmont Submitted to “Quantum Nonlocality and Reality – 50 Years of Bell’s theorem” The goal of this paper is to give a pedagogical introduction to Bell’s theorem and its implication for our view of the physical world, in particular how it establishes the existence of non local effects or of actions at a distance. We also discuss several misunderstandings… Read more →

Submitted paper: Haag’s Theorem as a Reason to Reconsider Direct-Action Theories

ABSTRACT. It is argued that the severe consequences of Haag’s inconsistency theorem for quantum field theories can be successfully evaded in the direct-action approach. Some recent favorable comments of John Wheeler, often mistakenly presumed to have abandoned his own (and Feynman’s) direct-action theory, together with the remarkable immunity of direct-action quantum electrodynamics to Haag’s theorem, suggest that it may well… Read more →

John Stuart Bell: recollections of a great scientist and a great man

John Stuart Bell: recollections of a great scientist and a great man

This contribution to the book in honour of J.S. Bell will probably differ from the remaining ones, in particular since only a part of it will be devoted to specific technical arguments. In fact I have considered appropriate to share with the community of physicists interested in the foundational problems of our best theory the repeated interactions I had with… Read more →

Bell non-locality, Hardy’s paradox and hyperplane dependence

Gordon N. Fleming Submitted to “Quantum Nonlocality and Reality – 50 Years of Bell’s theorem” I argue, in section 4, that the ‘elements of reality’ of Hardy’s famous gedanken experiment can retain their Lorentz invariance, i.e., their frame independence, if one recognizes the hyperplane dependence of their localization. This requires avoiding the conflation of hyperplane dependence with frame dependence, which… Read more →